Vote for the Girls

From Ava Zinn Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Vote for the Girls
VFTG logo 2013.png

Template:Hidden

URL voteforthegirls.us
Slogan Voting Males off since 2010
Commercial? Yes
Type of site Entertainment web site
Registration optional
Available language(s) English
Owner Aeverine Zinn Holdings

Vote for the Girls is an internet reality website moderator competition franchise created by American entrepreneur Ava Zinn. It originated in the United States, where it is based on Vote for the Girls USA, which Zinn created and was devised as her answer to Vote for the Worst. Many other countries have adapted the format and began airing their own versions since 2011. It has become a rival to the Vote for the Worst in the United States and Vote Against the Producers. As of 2014, VFTG held in 12 countries. The web series programs are produced by executive producer Ava Zinn and her company Aeverine Zinn Holdings. Vote for the Girls is a website devoted for voting for only female contestants, based on the original US website.


On Vote for the Girls (VFTG), fans of the site are encouraged to "only vote for female contestants" - call in and vote for who, they view, as to end the male winning streak on Idol. According to the site, the purpose is "to support voting for the entertaining contestants who the producers would love to see win on American Idol" in order to make it a "real good show."

The similarities between Vote for the Girls and Vote for the Worst prompted VFTW creator Dave Della Terza, to heavily criticize VFTG until Terza's site closed in May 2013.


History[edit]

American transwoman Ava Zinn, creator of INNewsCenter, first created the Vote for the Girls concept while watching American Idol in 2008. The site distinguishes itself as different from Vote for the Worst and Vote Against The Producers as Vote for the Girls primarily focuses on voting only for predominately female contestants not just on singing ability and prowess of her artistry, but also other factors. In a 2017 interview, Ava Zinn described Vote for the Girls as a spin-off of INNewsCenter with the NoSirGifts Newscast Mandate.

On April 28, 2010, Vote for the Girls USA launched with Ava Zinn, Holly Everman, and Robyn Hurd as the judges (dubbed as "moderators") of the site [1] following the elimination of Siobhan Magus on American Idol. The site proved to be an instant success in the United States.[2]

The format was later sold to different countries.

The American site started in 2010, which is devoted to voting for the female contestants on the Fox Network television series American Idol as well as The X Factor, and the NBC Network television series The Voice. Smaller campaigns have also been started on the site for ABC's Duets.

Unlike VFTW, where the site promotes votes for the worst, most entertaining, most hated or quirkiest contestants chosen by a public vote and the moderators only critique about the competition, on VFTG (which is somewhat rare of web sites) all decisions fall under one person, Zinn; and occasionally the moderators. As well as VFTW, new web site as of June 2013 Vote Against the Producers has become a rival web site to VFTG.

The format has appeared in three major versions: the main Vote for the Girls franchise, Celebrity Vote for the Girls featuring well known celebrities as supported contestants and Vote for the Girls: Junior Edition, a version created and adapted for children, which was first developed by Patrice Rafferty in 1989 and has also proliferated to other countries outside the United States since 2015.

Format[edit]

The site's format features four stages of competition. The first is the auditions, in which the moderator panel (between three and as many as ten female moderators), all noteworthy entertainment news presenters or correspondents with some background of the music industry, watch and listen to the contestants in seats. If a female moderator likes what they hear from the female contestant, they press a button as quickly as possible to to signify that they are interested in supporting that contestant. If more than one moderator presses their button, the VFTG moderator who pressed her button first or in some versions, the contestant's origin determines the moderator's supported contestant. The auditions end when each moderator has a set number of female contestants known as Vote for the Girls picks to promote votes for the particular contestant.

In some versions, there are flex picks where a VFTG Moderator can take a male soloist or a predominately male group from the opposing male moderator or villain by pressing a golden button. Each moderator has a set number of flex picks (usually one or two, even more depending on the progress of the female moderator).

In some versions, the moderator panel are split into two teams of between two and five moderators against two other teams in a battle of the sexes manner (Most often this is based on gender and gender identity, with women on the pink team, trans women on the purple, trans men on the red and men on the blue). The women, or the VFTG Moderators, on the pink and purple teams compete to get a Vote for the Girls Victory by getting more votes from the public for the female contestants (including flex picks) and eliminating all the male contestants before the females to get an all-female final and/or in some versions eliminate the Vote for the Worst picks (flex-picks not chosen by the female moderators) against the men, or the villains of the VFTG Moderator panel, on the red and blue teams get votes for the male contestants and eliminate the female contestants.

In this final performance phase of the competition, the VFTG Picks compete against each other during a live broadcast. Fans of Vote for the Girls are expected The television audience vote to save as many female contestants as possible, regardless of the television audience's decision on who they want to save and who will not move on.

In most versions, all moderators' supported contestants compete each week and usually only the public's vote determines which VFTG Picks or Flex Picks advance in the competition. This means that any female contestant can be eliminated and no moderator is guaranteed a spot in the finals.

In all competitions in all versions, fans of the site are expected to vote only for female contestants (including male-female duos, predominately and all girl groups, and on occasion since 2015 on some versions in a few versions a supported male contestant) en masse with the Vote for the Girls moderators and to expectations to vote off the male contestants and advance in the competition, and will boycott male contestants. The host's goal is to get an all-female final in every competition, but exceptional performances by the male contestants or VFTG villain's pick(s) will cause the host to end the competition early.

In most versions, the host demands that all male contestants at the earliest possible without regard to criticism and/or public backlash (meaning that fans of the site must vote for all remaining female contestants each week), introducing the possibility of an all-female finale or all-female final two (and guaranteeing a victory).


If the last female contestant is eliminated by the public's vote and not advance in the competition, the female moderators are out of the competition with a Vote for the Girls loss and the Vote for the Girls moderators faces punishment, usually doing very tedious tasks or more humiliating (usually cleaning the VFTG set and prepping for the next competition, handling the deliveries, such as sorting through the garbage, paying up on friendly wagers, etc.), as well as the VFTG moderators forced to support the female contestants in a make-up competition (usually So You Think You Can Dance, Dancing with the Stars, and/or Got Talent) in addition to the female moderators facing the aforementioned punishment(s). The villains, however, get a reward for success, typically rewarded with a recreational activity away from the VFTG set. In most versions, if there are no females remaining in the competition, the site will declare a "loss" and the winning villain is then decided in the competition's final.

With the addition of the "Moderators' Save," an element first used on the Swedish version and has since been adopted in other versions such as in particular case the site's sixth season on the American version, these losses can be declined by the moderator panel and none of the Vote for the Girls moderator panel faces punishment, yet the VFTG moderators are still forced to support the female contestants in a make-up competition. Conversely, in what has since become a tradition for any VFTG Loss on the American version, Ava Zinn usually takes these Punishments for Failure as blessings in disguise. Two clear examples occurred in the site's second American season which Ava Zinn auditioned for American Idol and the fifth American season which Ava Zinn went to a primary vegetarian diet, while other versions often kick the male's genitals.


Otherwise, the site claims a "victory" if all the male contestants are eliminated before the singing competition's finale and/or the female contestant is declared the winner and the Vote for the Girls moderators get a reward for success, typically rewarded with a recreational activity away from the VFTG set and other potential prizes. In all versions, if there are no males remaining in the competition, the site will declare a "double victory" and the winning moderator is then decided in the competition's final.

With the addition of "flexible picks", an element first used on the American version in 2015, and has since been adopted in a few versions, if a moderator's male flex pick and a VFTG pick or a villain's Vote for the Worst pick and a female flex pick is in the Top 2 or only one moderator has all of her picks and male flex picks left in the competition, the female moderator will earn a "double victory" and is reward for success, typically rewarded with a recreational activity away from the VFTG set and other potential prizes, such as her VFTG pick inducted in the Hall of Fame.

On the American version, if the winner and runner-up are from the same state or region, the moderator(s) involved are then declared the co-winning moderator(s). Two examples occurred on the ninth season of So You Think You Can Dance (Eliana Girard and Tiffany Maher) and the fifteenth and final season of American Idol (Trent Harmon and La'Porsha Renae).

As of January 2016, the Australian adaptation is only one of three Vote for the Girls franchises to have never declared a "loss" -- the others are Rösta för Flickorna (the Sweden version of VFTG) and Vota Femminili (the Italy version of VFTG) as the Italy and Swedish versions used the "Moderator's Save," which is now used on many versions of VFTG, in addition to make-up competitions.

VFTG Around the World[edit]

     Ongoing        Discontinued        Forthcoming  

Ava Zinn, as the creator of Vote for the Girls, supplies the host country with a logo, Facebook page, and Twitter handle. Even though other adaptations of Vote for the Girls vary with competitions of Victories, only Italy and Sweden have the rare distinction of not declaring a loss (counting "Moderator's Veto".) Ava Zinn hosts the adaptations in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia while in the other countries Ava Zinn is only credited as the creator.


Country/Region Local Title Language(s) Web site Seasons and Victories Moderators Presenters Status
Premiered Ended
 Argentina
 Australia Vote for the Girls AU English voteforthegirls.com.au July 26, 2015 November 25, 2015


Ava Zinn
Thia Tola
CANCELED
 Bolivia
 Brazil Vote for the Girls Brasil Spanish N/A April 6, 2014 present
  • Current:
    • Paulina
    • Agina
TBA Ongoing
 Chile
 China
 France Votez Pour Les Filles
Vote for the Girls France
French N/A June 2, 2010 Present


  • Current:
    • Millie Mack
    • Stefani Gould
    • Alexa David
    • Claice Kingsland
Sophia Williams Ongoing
 Germany Deutschland Voting für Women
(Germany's Vote for the Girls)
German N/A February 18, 2011 December 17, 2015
  • Current:
    • Cathy Preta
    • Carlotta Earlkopf
    • Guest Moderators
  • Former:
Jenny Riva Ongoing
 Mexico Vota por los Chicas Mexico
(Vote for the Girls Mexico)
Spanish N/A April 6, 2014 present
  • Current:


TBA Ongoing
 India
 Indonesia
 Israel
 Italy Vota Femminili
(Vote for the Girls)
Italian N/A August 23, 2010 December 10, 2015
Alessandra Griffin CANCELED
 Japan
 Philippines
 Puerto Rico
 Russia
 Singapore
 Sweden Rösta för Flickorna Sverige
Vote for the Girls Sweden
Swedish N/A September 18, 2011 December 11, 2015
  • Current:
Elaine Carlton Canceled
 Thailand Vote for the Girls THAI Thai N/A April 20, 2011 2014
  • Season 1 (2011): Maneepatsorn Molly[7] (Thailand's Got Talent)
  • Season 2 (2012)
  • Season 3 (2013)
  • Season 4 (2014)
Cancelled.
REASON: Three consecutive losing seasons.
 Turkey Vote for the Girls
(Vote for the Girls)
Turkish TBD present Future Season 1 (2014): - Upcoming
Current:
TBA
TBD Forthcoming
 United Kingdom Vote for the Girls UK English voteforthegirls.co.uk June 1, 2013 December 2016

}}

Ava Zinn Ongoing
 United States Vote for the Girls English voteforthegirls.us April 28, 2010 Present


  • Current:
    • Ava Zinn
    • Holly Everman (6-8)
    • Alexandra Moffitt (9-)
Ongoing
 Uruguay
 Venezuela
List of news presenters/correspondents who became moderators in versions of more than one country/region:[edit]
  • Thailand Thia TolaThailand (1-4), United States (guest 6, solo 7-8, duo 9-future ), Australia (1), New Zealand (duo 4-present), and United Kingdom (4-)
  • United States Ava ZinnUnited States (solo 1-6, 9-, duo 6-8 ), United Kingdom (1-3) and Australia (1)
  • United States Karly JamesonUnited States (solo 6, duo 7-present), and United Kingdom (3-present), and Australia (1)


List of moderators that won in versions of more than one country/region:[edit]


Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The Moderators' Veto, first introduced on the Swedish version introduced a veto power in which the moderators have the right to void a Vote for the Girls Loss which they used at their very first opportunity. For the Moderators Veto to be used, all of the moderators must vote yes and be unanimous. In such cases, the site does declare a draw (as opposed to a loss or a victory), and the moderators face a "Punishment for Vote for the Girls Loss" because no loss was declared. However, if the Moderators Veto is used in a make-up competition (Dancing with the Stars, So You Think You Can Dance, Got Talent), the moderators do not will not be able to make any wild card picks for the regular competitions (Idol, The Voice, X Factor, Rising Star.) Such occurrances happened in the following VFTG versions' seasons:
  2. ^ The Male and Female VFTG Victories, first introduced on the American version in the Spring 2015 introduced a two victory format (one male and one female) and must be used with Moderators' Save. In such cases, the site's moderators do not face a "Punishment for Vote for the Girls Loss" nor participate in a make-up competition because no loss was declared. The only way a loss will be declared in that situation is when a male contestant not supported by the web site (or known as the Ava Zinn version of Vote for the Worst pick) wins the competition and/or the Moderators' Veto is not used. This later modified on the American version in the Fall of 2015 with the introduction of "flexible picks" allowing a female moderator to support a male contestant
  3. ^ In the American version of Vote for the Girls, Ava Zinn served as a solo moderator from seasons 1 to the fall cycle of season 6. In the season 6 spring cycle of the said franchise, she was joined by her civil partner Kymberly Alvaraz, and became the web site's first duo moderator called "Ava & Kymberly".
  4. ^ In the American version of Vote for the Girls, Holly Everman served as a solo moderator from seasons 1 to 6. During the fall cycle of season 6, Holly was suspended after her second DUI arrest and her niece, Nermal filled in. In the season 7 of the said franchise, Holly was joined by her civil partner Perri Johnson, and became the web site's second duo moderator called "Holly & Perri".
  5. ^ In the American version of Vote for the Girls, Hillary Matthewson filled in as a guest moderator upon the death of Robyn Hurd during season 3 until the start of season 5 and Tracia Ward served as a solo moderator in the season six spring cycle until the season 7 fall cycle. In the season seven spring cycle of the said franchise, Tracia Ward and Hillary Matthewson became the web site's third duo moderator called "Tracia & Hillary".
  6. ^ In the American version of Vote for the Girls, Kathi Jameson served a solo moderators from the season 5 spring cycle to her termination on September 18, 2014 while and Karly Ryder, Jr. (now Karly Jameson) served as a solo moderator in the season six fall cycle until her termination in November 2014. In the season seven spring cycle of the said franchise, Kathi and Karly Jameson became the web site's fourth duo moderator called "Kathi & Karly".
  7. ^ In the American version of Vote for the Girls, Lanise White served as a solo moderator from seasons 6 to 7. In the season 8 of the said franchise, she will be joined by her civil partner Danni McClannahan, and will become the web site's fifth duo moderator called "Danni & Lanise".

Moderators' Saves[edit]


References[edit]

  1. ??
  2. ??
  3. 3.00 3.01 3.02 3.03 3.04 3.05 3.06 3.07 3.08 3.09 3.10 3.11 3.12 3.13 3.14 3.15 3.16 Make-up competition (United States, Germany, France, United Kingdom, and Australia)
  4. 4.0 4.1 The Italian and French versions both introduced a veto power in Vota Femminili 2011 and Votez Pour Les Filles 2011, respectively, in which the moderators had the right to void a Vote for the Girls Loss which they used at their very first opportunity. This was first introduced in the Sweden version and later used on future adaptations of Vote for the Girls.
  5. Before the Germany Idol 12 finale on May 16, 2015, the moderators were given the option by each taking an anonymous vote to either use their veto power in which the moderators will use their Moderators' Save on Grisafi if all votes were "yes" Jenny Riva would declare a perfect season and the moderators will not choose any wild card picks for the upcoming season of The Voice of Germany. The votes ended with all moderators voting yes. With Jenny declaring the first Perfect year when it was revealed that Jamie-Lee Kriewitz won the fifth season of The Voice of Germany. Had the moderators not been unanimous, the site would have declared a loss.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 The Swedish version introduced a veto power in which the moderators had the right to void a Vote for the Girls Loss which they used at their very first opportunity
  7. The winner of Thialand's Got Talent also competed on the first season of the American version of Rising Star and later a Vote for the Girls USA pick.
  8. 8.0 8.1 ??
  9. Before the American version of the So You Think You Can Dance 11 finale on September 3, 2014, the moderators were given the option by each taking an anonymous vote to either go by Valerie Rockey winning SYTYCD since there was one winner or if all votes were "yes" Ava Zinn would declare a Vote for the Girls victory based on the dual-winners format used on SYTYCD 9 and 10 and the moderators will not choose any wild card or steal picks for the upcoming seasons of The Voice and American Idol. The votes ended with all moderators voting yes. With Ava ignoring the single winner format reinstated for the 11th season of So You Think You Can Dance and going by the two winners (one male and one female) for the competition, Ava declared a the first Vote for the Girls victory of 2014 when it was revealed that Ricky Ubela (the actual winner of So You Think You Can Dance 11) was declared the male winner and Zach Everhart, Jr. (finished in 4th Place) the male runner-up while Valerie Rockey (the runner-up of So You Think You Can Dance 11) was declared the female winner and Jessica Richens (finished in 3rd Place and the Vote for the Girls victory) the female runner-up. Had the moderators not been unanimous, the site would have declared its fourth consecutive loss as well as the first SYTYCD loss.
  10. Moderators' Veto was used upon Shirey's elimination on December 2, 2014.
  11. The moderators' Save was used on both a male and a female supported contestant. In addition, Fradiani became the very first male Vote for the the Girls pick under the Alex & Sierra rule. During the auditions, Fradiani auditioned with his significant other, Ariana Garvrilis (aka Yanni G), and Zinn declared Fradiani close enough to an Alex & Sierra pick for American Idol. Also upon the elimination of Tyanna Jones, Cole was the last remaining female, and became eligible of the Moderators' Save since all eight moderators voted unanimously in favor of Cole. As before, Ava ignored "the last female standing" format and went by the two winners (one male and one female) for the competition, Ava declared a the first dual Vote for the Girls victory when it was revealed that Fradiani (the actual winner of So You Think You Can Dance 11) was declared the male winner and Clark Beckham (finished 2nd) the male runner-up while Jax (finished third) was declared the female winner and Tyanna Jones (finished in 5th Place) the female runner-up.
  12. The web site declared two victories (one male and one female) for the competition upon the announcement of the third place finish of Noah Galloway & Sharna Burgess (chosen by Thia Tola), Willis & Chmerkovskiy (the actual winner of Danicng with the Stars 20) was declared the female winner (chosen by Kendra Ray) while Lynch & Holker (runner-up) was declared the male winner (chosen by Ava Zinn & Kymberly Alvaraz).
  13. Sawyer Fredericks became the very first male Vote for the the Girls pick under based on appearance and vocals during Fredericks' audition, and Zinn approved Fredericks as a Vote for the Girls pick for the pink team moderators (Holly Everman, Kellie Rock, Tracia Ward, and Thia Tola). Sawyer Fredericks became Tola's pick. Also during the blind auditions, Meghan Linsey became eligible of the Moderators' Save since all eight moderators voted unanimously in favor of Liney. Like the American Idol 14 competition, Ava went by the two winners (one male and one female) for the competition and declared a another dual Vote for the Girls victory when it was revealed that Koryn Hawthorne (finished 4th) was decalred the female runner-up and Joshua Davis (finished 3rd) was announced the male runner-up and Fredericks (the actual winner of The Voice 8) was declared the male winner and while Linsey (the runner-up of The Voice 8) was declared the female winner. Additionally, the main moderator panel did not have to particpate in a make-up competition nor face any punishments for failure.
  14. Bindi Irwin, the winner of the twenty-first season of the American version of Dancing with the Stars was later imported Vote for the Girls Australia Hall of Fame upon her American victory.


Retrieved from "http://wiki-beta.avazinn.com/w/index.php?title=Vote_for_the_Girls&oldid=23889"